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Ivan Milosavljević

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Ivan Milosavljević, Ph.D.


Assistant Project Scientist 
Phone: (951) 827-4360
ivanm@ucr.edu


Dr. Milosavljević joined the Hoddle laboratory in 2016 as a postdoctoral researcher. His postdoctoral work has embraced a wide range of research projects. An example of these projects include: 

(1) evaluating the ongoing biological control efforts concerning the Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in California. His research examined the population dynamics of D. citri, and its biological control agents Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis and Tamarixia radiata in Southern California. Additionally, he worked on the degree-day requirements for D. citri, D. aligarhensis, and T. radiata

(2) developing detection programs for the invasive South American palm weevil (Rhynchophorus palmarum). Currently, he is working with a commercial pesticide company on a large replicated field trial to evaluate the efficacy of a range of systemic pesticides for protecting palms in San Diego County from R. palmarum in infested urban areas; and 

(3) mitigating export risks associated with bean thrips (Caliothrips fasciatus).    

Dr. Milosavljević was promoted to Assistant Project Scientist in 2020. His current research focuses on the development and evaluation of novel technological tools to improve and streamline the process of controlling sap sucking citrus pests (SSPs), including D. citri, and the ants that tend them in commercial citrus. The main target is the Argentine ant (AA), Linepithema humile, the most ubiquitous and problematic tramp ant found in Southern California. AA protects SSPs from natural enemies which allows pest populations to reach high densities. 

Biocontrol-augmenting ant suppression is achieved through the use of low-toxicity, soil applied biodegradable alginate hydrogel beads (HGBs). Dr. Milosavljević is currently collaborating with scientists from UCR's Department of Engineering and Computer Sciences to develop and test an infrared sensors (IRS) and cloud-based tools to automatically monitor and report AA activity. He is also collaborating with Dr. Irvin on the use of cover crops (CCs) to boost NE populations in citrus orchards. The combination of these three tools, HGBs, IRS, and CCs will provide sustainable IPM-based toolbox for AA and SSP management in citrus.

Products and strategies derived from this research could be re-appropriated for other valuable cropping systems that suffer greatly from ant-tended pests (i.e., wine grapes and tree nuts), considerably improving biological control across California and upholding its historical precedent of strongly successful IPM programs.
 

Curriculum vitae

Google Scholar

ResearchGate

 

Degrees

  • Ph.D. Entomology, Department of Entomology, Washington State University (2015)
  • M.Sc. Phytomedicine, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Belgrade, Serbia (2013)
  • B.Sc. Phytomedicine, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Belgrade, Serbia (2011)

 

Current Projects

Argentine Ant

Argentine Ant

Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is an efficient vector of the bacterial citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease, which is one of the most destructive insect-borne diseases of citrus worldwide.

 

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Asian Citrus Psyllid (Diaphorina citri)

Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is an efficient vector of the bacterial citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease, which is one of the most destructive insect-borne diseases of citrus worldwide.

 

California Red Scale

Citrus Red Scale

Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is an efficient vector of the bacterial citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease, which is one of the most destructive insect-borne diseases of citrus worldwide.

 

Brown Soft Scale

Brown Soft Scale

Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is an efficient vector of the bacterial citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease, which is one of the most destructive insect-borne diseases of citrus worldwide.

 

Citrus Mealybug

Citrus Mealybug

Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is an efficient vector of the bacterial citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease, which is one of the most destructive insect-borne diseases of citrus worldwide.

 

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North American Bean Thrips

Bean thrips adults and larvae feed mainly on mature leaves and occasionally the skin of immature fruit.

 

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South American Palm Weevil

The South American palm weevil, Rhynchophorus palmarum (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), has a known distribution that includes Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. Like other species of Rhynchophorus, such as the red palm weevil, R. ferrugineus, and the palm weevil R. vulneratus

 

Book Chapters

 

Publications

 

 

 

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